Historic Oak View Group Programs

Students on a field trip to Historic Oak View exploring the herb garden. They are gathered around a lamb's ear plant.

Group programs are programs requested and scheduled for particular school or user groups. You can learn more about the types of group programs and field trips offered by this park site below.

About our Programs

Historic Oak View County Park offers curriculum-based educational programs for students to use the lens of change over time to learn about the daily lives of 19th and 20th century farmers. Through hands-on activities and engaging presentations, your students will leave Oak View with a deeper understanding of the lives of the people –  enslaved and free, landowner and landless – who lived, worked, and built community at Oak View before and after the Civil War.

Reservations are required in advance for any staff-led program. There are no fees for group programs. We offer different programs for elementary schools, homeschool/daycare/track-out groups, as well as older students and adult visitors. All educational programs are for groups of 8 or more. Descriptions of our program offerings can be found below.

Elementary Schools

All morning programs begin at 10 a.m. and last until noon. However, this availability is affected by staff schedules and other external factors. At most, we can accommodate approximately 90 students per field trip. However, we recommend groups of 75 or less per scheduled visit to ensure the best experience. Our field trip programs are free of charge and include free use of our picnic shelter lunch following your programs, provided that you indicate in advance.

Your students will rotate through three 35-minute programs, tailored to comply with the grade's Social Studies requirements in the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. The programs are intended for 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade students but can be tailored for any elementary grade. Each school that visits will rotate through all three programs listed below:

In the Farm's Kitchen
Through an engaging presentation in the 1825 plank kitchen, students will learn about the history of southern foodways and the cultural fusions that shaped the region's diverse food systems. Students will discover the story of Eliza Hutchings, an enslaved woman, and how the transition from slavery to freedom affected the domestic work and skills of women in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Farming for Freedom
During this interactive program presented in the early 20th century cotton gin house, students will learn about the lives of several Oak View sharecroppers and tenant farmers to understand the relationship between farming, land, and freedom. Students will learn about the history and mechanical workings of the cotton gin and the labor system that existed to support Oak View's cotton ginning operation. 

Artifact Detectives
During this program, students become artifact detectives. They will examine artifacts and primary sources to discover the stories of different individuals who lived, worked, and built community at Oak View. This program encourages students to use critical thinking skills to analyze artifacts, ask compelling questions, and use inquiry-based learning to draw conclusions about the past lives of sharecroppers and tenant farmers. *This program includes a visit to the Oak View goats.

To submit your field trip request:

  1. Fill out and submit the Field Trip Request Form
  2. Email abigail.kellerman@wakegov.com with field trip reservation requests
  3. Call 919-212-7695 between 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m., Monday–Friday

 

Historic Oak View Field Trips Meet These NC Essential Standards:

Second grade
2.B.1.1 Identify the various values and beliefs of diverse cultures that have shaped American identity.
2.G.1.3 Interpret how the movement of people, goods, and ideas has impacted the regional development of America.
2.H.1.1 Summarize contributions of various women, indigenous, religious, racial, and other minority groups that have impacted American history.
2.H.1.2 Explain ways in which various historical events have shaped American history.
2.H.1.3 Compare various perspectives of the same time period using primary and secondary sources.

Third grade
B.1.1 Explain how the values, beliefs, and cultures of various indigenous, religious, racial and other groups contribute to the development of local communities and the state.
3.E.1.2 Explain how the natural resources of a region impact the production and consumption of goods in local communities.
3.G.1.3 Explain how movement of goods, people, and ideas is impacted by the geography of a place or region.
3.H.1.1 Explain how the experiences and achievements of women, indigenous, religious, and racial groups have contributed to the development of the local community.
3.H.1.2 Explain the lasting impact historical events have had on local communities.
3.H.1.3 Use primary and secondary sources to compare multiple interpretations of various historical symbols and events in local communities.

Fourth grade
4.B.1.2 Explain how the values and beliefs of various indigenous, religious, and racial groups have contributed to the development of North Carolina.
4.E.1.2 Explain factors that have led to economic growth and decline for North Carolina’s major industries.
4.E.1.3 Explain ways in which factors of production are influenced by the availability of resources in North Carolina.
4.G.1.3 Summarize the reasons for forced and voluntary migration to, from, and within North Carolina.
4.H.1.1 Explain how the experiences and achievements of minorities, indigenous groups, and marginalized people have contributed to change and innovation in North Carolina.
4.H.1.2 Summarize the changing roles of women, indigenous populations and racial groups throughout the history of North Carolina.
4.H.1.5 Use primary and secondary sources to compare multiple perspectives of various historical events in North Carolina.

Small Groups, Homeschools, Daycares, Track Out Camps and Scout Troops

Staff-led programs are available for organized groups. Choose from the program options below:

Artifact Adventure – This program challenges participants to identify artifacts around Oak View with an "I spy" inspired game. Participants will learn about each artifact and how the artifact fits into Oak View’s history. The Artifact Adventure program is best suited for elementary ages.

Plantation to Park – This program is an engaging tour around the property that discusses the history of Oak View from the 1830s to present. You'll hear about the lives of the people who lived, labored, and built community here, the ways in which they worked, and the transitions that took place in their lives before and after the Civil War. This tour is best suited for upper-elementary to adults.

Plants with a Past – A themed walking tour that focuses on the land, crops, and garden areas of Oak View. Learn about how these spaces were designed, created, and maintained through history, with a special emphasis on how enslaved labor and then sharecroppers and tenant farmers shaped the landscape in the 19th and 20th centuries. This tour is best suited for upper-elementary to adults.

Ready to schedule your program? Fill out the Program Request Form or contact Abigail Kellerman, Assistant Park Manager of Education at abigail.kellerman@wakegov.com, or by calling 919-212-7695.

Middle School, High School and Adult Groups

Staff-led programs are available for organized groups. Choose from the program options below:

Plantation to Park – This program is an engaging tour around the property that discusses the history of Oak View from the 1830s to present. You'll hear about the lives of the people who lived, labored, and built community here, the ways in which they worked, and the transitions that took place in their lives before and after the Civil War.

Plants with a Past – A themed walking tour that focuses on the land, crops, and garden areas of Oak View. Learn about how these spaces were designed, created, and maintained through history, with a special emphasis on how enslaved labor and then sharecroppers and tenant farmers shaped the landscape in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Ready to schedule your program? Fill out the Program Request Form or contact Abigail Kellerman, Assistant Park Manager of Education at abigail.kellerman@wakegov.com, or by calling 919-212-7695.