Since 1996, the Wake County Register of Deeds Office has focused on improving customer service, making it easier for patrons to do business with the office both in person and online.
 
Here are some of our recent accomplishments
  • Implemented an electronic vital records request system, providing the public with the ability to request birth, death and marriage certificates electronically, in addition to mail requests or in person.

  • Upgraded the cashiering application from VB6 technology to current VB.Net technology.  This provided staff and customers with a cleaner, more efficient application. A new report module was added with the upgrade, allowing supervisors to easily run daily reports.

  • Updated the administration application, upgrading all functions to web based programs. This upgrade centralized all modules within the application and improved system performance and monitoring.

  • Updated the scanning application. This upgrade increased the speed of scanning documents, improved accuracy and quality control.  This upgrade also allowed for the elimination of a number of servers, improving the overall efficiency of the Registry technology systems.

  • Continued the promotion and expansion of eRecording. The number of customers eRecording documents has increased to over 592 participants. Electronic recordings increased by 76% from 2013 to 2014.

  • Implemented an enhancement to the electronic recording application to allow customers to rerecord documents electronically rather than in person.

  • Promoted the benefits of eRecording and updated the Wake County Real Property Lawyers Association on the progress of eRecording after the first full year of expanding the service to include all document types.

  • Updated the marriage license application and computer system to comply with changes in North Carolina state law.

  • Added barcodes when recording maps to improve the efficiency of the recording process. Maps are now scanned with a barcode label and pertinent information is automatically populated into the system rather than being entered manually.

  • Continued the cross-training program within the Registry with particular focus on increasing the number of employees that can index legal documents according to North Carolina general statutes.  This measure provides additional capacity to efficiently index documents during intervals of peak volume.

  • The office has redacted more than 51,500 items of personal information from documents covering a 50 year range from 1961-2010.

  • The scanning department rescanned 16,740 maps that were recorded in the 1980’s to improve the image quality.  Technology advances allow for better quality scanning. This effort is particularly helpful to local surveyors that view these maps regularly.

  • Instituted an electronic recording work unit within the Registry and added the electronic recording work responsibility to the Registry’s cross-training program.

  • Presented to the Wake County Real Property Lawyers Association on the expanded electronic recording services offered to customers.

  • Migrated registry website content from a third-party hosted solution to the Wake County SharePoint platform, saving the county $5,500 per year.

  • Implemented a custom IT service request system for staff to initiate service requests related to technology used in the Registry.

  • Relocated the Registry to the Wake County Justice Center over one weekend in June of 2013. The Register of Deeds was able to reduce the size of the registry by 2,840 square feet while providing the same level of service to customers. The reduction in square footage produced more than $800,000 in construction savings and ongoing reductions in operating costs.

  • Implemented an electronic recording application that allows customers to submit all document types for recording electronically rather than in person. Electronic recordings increased by 24% from 2012 to 2013.

  • Received a 2010 Outstanding County Program Award from the N.C. Association of County Commissioners for putting county land and map records online. The Wake Register of Deeds office collaborated with the State Division of Archives and History to put records dating back to 1785 online and available to the public.

  • Wake Register of Deeds Laura M. Riddick selected by peers to serve second term as chairwoman of Automation and Technology Committee for the North Carolina Register of Deeds Association. Under Riddick’s direction, the committee focused on redaction efforts throughout the state and eRecording initiatives.

  • Completed 11-year project to scan and index real property documents recorded in Wake County. The oldest is an Indenture Agreement recorded July 7, 1785. It can be viewed in the BOOKS online index.

  • Unveiled BOOKS web interface upgrade, which includes a more readable design, option to view documents in PDF format, and an improved help system with a Guide Me section on the search page and updated video tutorials.

  • Achieved the North Carolina Department of the Secretary of State Indexing Standards Certification. Wake's Consolidated Real Property Index system met and exceeded the legislative standards for the way county Registers of Deeds index real property records.

  • Scanned and indexed all real estate documents back to 1785. More than 28,034 documents recorded in 52 deed books were obtained from the NC Department of Cultural Resources, Division of Archives and History to complete this project. These records are available online in BOOKS, our Web-based consolidated real property index system.

  • Scanned and indexed 67 Corporation books containing 12,411 documents from 1926 to 1968 into BOOKS.

  • Scanned and indexed 8 Partnership books containing 3,108 documents covering 1912 to 1974 into BOOKS.

  • Converted all birth and death records in the Register of Deeds office into digital format. More than 218,211 birth records and 407,552 death records dating back to 1913 were scanned and indexed. A total of 625,763 images were imported into our Vital Records system.

  • Scanned and indexed removal of grave certificates filed from 1965 to present and imported the document images into our Vital Records system.

  • Scanned and indexed 19,000 military discharges and imported the document images into the Vital Records system.

  • Provided automated access to birth and death records dating back to 1913 and marriage records since 1931. The public and genealogists can search these records on computers located in the Register of Deeds public research areas. Social Security numbers and other personal information are blocked for personal privacy.

  • Implemented cross-training program to make staff members proficient in a variety of department functions.

  • Re-bound 155,656 birth certificates in 131 index books from years 1913 to 1963.

  • Scanned and indexed 2,500 marriage licenses recorded from 1979 back to Jan. 1, 1931.

  • Implemented a new marriage license database and Web application for marriage licenses.

  • Scanned and indexed 59,513 Deeds of Trust marginal entries recorded in 2,855 real estate books between 1974 and 1991. Previously available only on microfilm, these records can now be viewed on the Wake County Register of Deeds website.

  • Upgraded the BOOKS workflow software and related hardware, which allows the registry to share information with Revenue and GIS.

  • Received the National Association of Counties (NACo) Achievement Award for implementing the Electronic Recording of Satisfaction Documents.

  • Relocated the office from the Garland Jones Building to the Bank of America Plaza. Our office moved 6,077 real estate deed books.

  • Implemented an automated vital records database system for birth and death certificates.

  • C.L. Mann and tax maps from 1895 to 1998 made available for online access.

  • Assumed leadership of Wake County Vital Records from Wake County Human Services. The unit transferred to Wake Register of Deeds on Jan. 13, 2005, in an effort to improve service delivery and better maintain permanent vital records.

  • Scanned and indexed 2,700 State Highway Commission maps, dating back to 1967.