Home
February 13
​Friday Marks Last Day to Vote on Health Priorities for Wake County

Wake County residents have just a few days left to help determine what the county’s health priorities should be for the next three years.

Online voting is open until Friday, Feb. 15, at 5 p.m. Just visit  wakegov.com/wellbeing to complete the survey. It’s quick and easy and will make a real difference in how we plan for the future.

Online voting is a key part of the Community Health Needs Assessment, which the county and about 60 partner organizations conduct every three years. Its goal is to develop a list of top priorities the county and its partners can focus on to improve the overall health and well-being of the county.

The CHNA involves analyzing health data and statistics, as well as gathering input from residents and professional and non-profit providers.

Through this process so far, the CHNA team has identified 21 areas of possible improvement. Your votes will help narrow that down to a more realistic and achievable number. Then, the CHNA team will compile all the feedback and use it to create a report that will guide decision making from 2019–2021.

The CHNA is a collaborative effort among Wake County, WakeMed, Duke Raleigh Hospital, UNC Rex Healthcare, Advance Community Health, The United Way of the Greater Triangle and Wake County Medical Society Community Health Foundation. The process is overseen by a steering committee comprised of more than 60 community partners, including local governments, hospitals, schools, faith-based organizations, non-profit organizations, businesses and other stakeholders.
February 11
Be a Sweetheart and Adopt a Pet for Valentine’s Day

Discounts start Monday, gift certificates available

Love is in the air at the Wake County Animal Center, where more than 80 cordial canines and cuddlesome cats are just waiting for that special someone to sweep them off their feet.

Today through Feb. 17, adoption fees will be reduced for pets ages six months and older. It will cost $25 to take home a dog, and you can name your price for cats.

“We have 51 dogs and 32 cats hoping to find their soulmates this Valentine’s Day,” said Dr. Jennifer Federico, director of the Wake County Animal Center. “These sweethearts would love nothing more than to shower your family with unconditional love.”

In addition to the reduced fees, adopting an adult animal eliminates a lot of guesswork from the process. That’s because these mature cats and dogs have already settled into their unique personalities and behaviors, and shelter staff will be happy to let you know if a certain pet is right for you.

In addition to the animals in the shelter, Wake County also has a number of pets in foster care. These dogs and cat spend their days living in a home and interacting in social settings with our trained volunteers, and that experience prepares them to settle in quickly to a new home.

Ready to find your new furry sweetheart? View a gallery of the animals currently available for adoption.

Give Your Valentine a Gift Certificate
Looking for the perfect present for your favorite animal lover? Skip the chocolate and flowers this Valentine’s Day and give the gift of unconditional love with a gift certificate to the Wake County Animal Center!

Rather than surprising someone with an animal – and all the financial and time commitments that come along with owning a pet – gift certificates allow recipients to pick out the dog or cat of their choice at their convenience.

Gift certificates are available for any dollar amount and may be redeemed for the adoption of pets within a year of purchase. Any amount left over after the adoption will be donated to the shelter.

About the Wake County Animal Center
The Wake County Animal Center is an open-admission shelter operated by Wake County. The center receives all stray, abandoned and surrendered pets in the county and works in partnership with fosters, volunteers and local rescues to treat and rehome thousands of homeless animals every year.

To learn more about the Wake County Animal Center and animals available for adoption, visit wakegov.com/pets, and follow the center on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at @WakeGovPets.

February 07
​Wake Forest Community Library to Reopen Feb. 24

Wake County Public Libraries will celebrate the reopening of the Wake Forest Community Library with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Sunday, Feb. 24. The event will take place at 2 p.m. at the library, which is located at 400 E. Holding Ave., Wake Forest.

“The library has always been an important part of this community, and we’re so excited to reopen it,” said Ann Burlingame, deputy director of Wake County Public Libraries. “This new and improved building will serve library patrons for years to come, and we look forward to making new memories with all of our visitors.”

The event will include the opportunity to check out the library, meet staff and hear from:

  • Greg Ford, vice chair, Wake County Board of Commissioners
  • Vivian Jones, mayor, Town of Wake Forest
  • Mike Wasilick, director, Wake County Public Libraries
  • Ann Burlingame, deputy director, Wake County Public Libraries
  • Lisa Behrens, chair, Wake County Library Commission

The library, which has expanded from 5,000 to 9,000 square feet, will offer youth programs, a collection of between 40,000 and 50,000 books, 16 public computers and WiFi. It will feature an increased youth programming space and enlarged reading and study areas for both children and adults.

For the first time, the Wake Forest Community Library will be open seven days a week. The Wake County Board of Commissioners approved the expanded hours in its Fiscal Year 2019 budget, as recommended by the Wake County Library Commission.

Located at the southern edge of Wake Forest’s downtown, the library serves the growing communities of Wake Forest, Rolesville and north Raleigh. It sits on a campus shared by Kiwanis Park, an EMS station and the Wake County Northern Regional Center. It originally opened in 1996.

The expansion, which began in September 2017, was a part of a $45 million bond approved by voters in 2007 to build, expand, renovate or repair libraries. Project costs totaled $2.64 million for construction, $272,800 for furniture and equipment, and $675,000 for books.

About Wake County Public Libraries
The mission of Wake County Public Libraries is to promote the love of reading and to foster the pursuit of knowledge for the residents of Wake County. In fiscal year 2018, our 22 libraries were visited more than 3.43 million times, and 235,251 people were active library cardholders.

February 05
​Public Invited to Weigh in on Wake County’s Next Park

Residents are invited to share their thoughts on the future Wake County Southeast Park at a community meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 12. The drop-in forum will take place from 4–7 p.m. at the Fuquay-Varina Community Center, 820 S. Main St., Fuquay-Varina.

“Forums like this are critical to our master planning process,” said Chris Snow, director of Wake County Parks, Recreation and Open Space. “They provide important feedback to the design team and allow residents to play an active role in the park’s development.”

Attendees will be able to view three different design options, which include the possible locations of trails, playgrounds, parking, agricultural fields and more. These designs were developed based on feedback collected from a public survey and the first community meeting on Sept. 25, 2018. More than 200 people came to the initial event to offer their insights and opinions.

Wake County Southeast Park will be located adjacent to the towns of Garner and Fuquay-Varina. The park property is made up of several parcels of land totaling approximately 300 acres. While a portion of the land adjacent to Highway 42 is currently agricultural land, the majority of the park contains undeveloped forests, wetlands, stream channels, floodplains and rock outcrops, all of which support a diverse ecosystem and help protect critical natural resources.

Find out more about the future park and view materials from the first community forum here. This project is another step forward in the county’s efforts to establish a deliberate and realistic approach to address growth and mobility while preserving our environment and healthy communities.

To learn more about Wake County Parks, Recreation and Open Space, follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WakeGovParks. You can also check out each of our parks on Facebook.
January 30
​Residents Can Help Determine Health Priorities for Wake County

The Community Health Needs Assessment is under way in Wake County, and as part of that effort, we’re asking residents to tell us what they think the county’s health priorities should be for the next three years.  

Community Meetings
Residents have several options to provide input on how the county and its partners can improve overall health and well-being in the county. On Thursday, Jan. 31, residents can participate in one of five in-person meetings from 6–7 p.m. at the following locations:

  • Northern Regional Center, 350 E. Holding Ave., Wake Forest;
  • Holly Springs Cultural Center, 300 W. Ballentine St., Holly Springs;
  • Anne Gordon Center, 1901 Spring Forest Road, Raleigh;
  • Apex Town Hall, 73 Hunter St, Apex; and
  • Eastern Regional Center, 1002 Dogwood Drive, Zebulon.

Online Voting
Beginning Monday, Feb. 4, residents may vote online by visiting wakegov.com/wellbeing through Friday, Feb. 15. Additionally, many of the more than 60 community partners that are a part of the CHNA will offer voting opportunities through other events over the next two weeks.

The CHNA is conducted every three years to determine what priorities the county and its partners should pursue to improve the overall health and well-being of the county. The assessment involves analyzing health data and statistics, as well as input from residents and professional and non-profit providers, to create a report to the community used to guide decision making for the next three years.

Learn more about the CHNA by visiting wakegov.com/wellbeing.

The CHNA is a collaborative effort among Wake County, WakeMed, Duke Raleigh Hospital, UNC Rex Healthcare, Advance Community Health, The United Way of the Greater Triangle and Wake County Medical Society Community Health Foundation. The process is overseen by a steering committee comprised of more than 60 community partners including local governments, hospitals, schools, faith-based organizations, non-profit organizations, businesses and other stakeholders.

January 28
February Takes Flight at Wake County Parks

Get out your binoculars, because it’s time for the Great Backyard Bird Count! This four-day, annual event takes place Feb. 15 – 18 and encourages bird watchers of all ages and skill levels to count birds and report their results online.

You’re welcome to count the birds in your own backyard, or if you prefer to be part of a flock, Wake County Parks, Recreation and Open Space has organized a variety of free special events. From morning bird walks to evening adventures, you’ll find a multitude of ways to get a bird’s eye view of our feathered friends.

Data collected during the Great Backyard Bird Count gives useful information to scientists, which enables them to better evaluate fluctuations in bird populations. To learn more, visit gbbc.birdcount.org.

Birds might be at the top of the pecking order in February, but there’s a lot more going on at Wake County parks and preserves. Check out some of the other great programs happening throughout the month:

Art at the Farm Exhibit
Feb. 1–April 3, Business hours
Historic Oak View County Park
This special show features art created by children ages 6 to 12 who attended painting classes at the park in January. Their work will be on display inside the Farm History Center during regular business hours. Historic Oak View County Park is located at 4028 Carya Drive, Raleigh.

Recreational Adventures: Weather Wisdom
Friday, Feb. 1, 2–3 p.m.
Historic Yates Mill County Park
The changing weather is probably the most easily observed part of the natural world and is experienced by everyone daily. Explore the four weather factors, observe the clouds and learn about extreme weather patterns. Then test your knowledge and forecast the weather. This is a free program, and preregistration is required. Historic Yates Mill County Park is located at 4620 Lake Wheeler Road, Raleigh.

Nature Watchers: Nutty Squirrels
Wednesday, Feb. 6, 11 a.m.–noon
Crowder County Park
Celebrate our silly squirrels! Come learn about these friendly mammals, gather nuts in a fun game and make a squirrelly craft to take home. Then spy on the live squirrels at Crowder as they jump from tree to tree searching for the perfect nut. This program is free,  and preregistration is required. Meet at the Upper Pavilion. Crowder District Park is located at 4709 Ten Ten Road, Apex.

Family Wildlife Series:  Winter Wander
Saturday, Feb. 9, 10–11 a.m.
Blue Jay Point County Park
Join us for a winter walk and plant ID session. Make a winter plant collage while learning about critters that depend on those plants for their winter habitat needs. Not stroller friendly—baby backpacks please. Preregistration is required. Blue Jay Point County Park is located at 3200 Pleasant Union Church Road, Raleigh.

Nature Nerds
Wednesday, Feb. 13, noon–1 p.m.
Lake Crabtree County Park
Expand your knowledge of our local flora and fauna by exploring a different area of the park each month. Join us as we observe a recently discovered active eagle nest and the mudflat area, which is a popular hangout for many birds. Help collect data for the Natural Resource Inventory Database while increasing your own identification skills. This program is for ages 9 and older, and minors must be accompanied by a registered adult. Preregistration is required. Lake Crabtree County Park is located at 1400 Aviation Parkway, Morrisville.

GBBC Bird Walk along the American Tobacco Trail
Friday, Feb. 15, 8–10 a.m.
American Tobacco Trail
Observe and count the variety of birds that can be found along the trail as we walk to the Beaver Creek Bridge. This is free program for ages 6 and older, but preregistration is required. Meet near the restrooms at the New Hill parking area at 1309 New Hill-Olive Chapel Road, Apex.

Wacky Woodpeckers
Monday, Feb. 18, 10:30 a.m.–noon
Harris Lake County Park
Woodpeckers are some of the most recognizable birds, but how much do you really know about them? Learn some cool facts, hear common woodpecker calls, make a suet log feeder for your family to take home, and go on a short hike to look and listen for them. This program, part of the Great Backyard Bird Count, is free for all ages,  but preregistration is required. Meet at the Cypress Shelter. Harris Lake County Park is located at 2112 County Park Drive, New Hill.

To see a list of upcoming programs and events, visit wakegov.com/parks.

Reminder
Our Park Locator makes it easy to explore all the parks and preserves in Wake County! Filter results by activity or location, and get customized directions.

About Wake County Parks, Recreation and Open Space
Wake County Parks, Recreation and Open Space strives to provide outdoor recreation and educational opportunities while promoting environmental and cultural stewardship through a managed system of parks and open spaces. In 2018, more than 385,000 people visited Wake County’s 10 parks and nature preserves.

To learn more about Wake County Parks, Recreation and Open Space, follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WakeGovParks. You can also check out each of our parks on Facebook.
January 17
​Authors, Illustrator to Explore Literary Legacy of Coretta Scott King Award

As we prepare to celebrate Black History Month, three award-winning panelists will join Wake County Public Libraries to discuss the history of the Coretta Scott King Award and the literary legacy of African American children’s books. The program will take place on Sunday, Jan. 27, at Cameron Village Regional Library in Raleigh.

“It’s a great opportunity to bring people together to talk about what this special award means to all readers, especially African American children,” said panel moderator Judy Allen Dodson, a librarian and archivist at the Olivia Raney Local History Library. “We’ll also explore what must happen to preserve and foster this legacy—and the challenges that exist.”

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They honor the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and his wife, Coretta, for her courage to continue working for peace after her husband’s death.

These awards are given annually to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.

The panelists, all Coretta Scott King Award-winners, include:

Hear their thoughts on the significance of the award’s 50th anniversary, what distinguishes a good children’s book, how the legacy of African American children’s literature has evolved and more.

The event will run from 2–4 p.m. and include refreshments, book signings and crafts. Learn more and register here.

 

About Wake County Public Libraries
The mission of Wake County Public Libraries is to promote the love of reading and to foster the pursuit of knowledge for the residents of Wake County. In fiscal year 2018, our 22 libraries were visited more than 3.43 million times, and 235,251 people were active library cardholders.
January 15
The Value of Wake County Real Estate Transactions Continue to Rise

letterhead.png

 

Tuesday, January 15, 2019
For Immediate Release

Contact: Luther Snyder, Deputy Director
O. 919-856-5462 M. 919-369-7045
luther.snyder@wakegov.com

THE VALUE OF WAKE COUNTY REAL ESTATE
TRANSACTIONS CONTINUE TO RISE

MEDIAN REAL ESTATE TRANSFER PRICES ARE UP 31%
OVER THE PAST FOUR YEARS

Raleigh, NC – For both the fourth quarter and full year 2018 the value of Wake County real estate transactions is up substantially compared to 2017.

During 2018, $14.2 billion worth of real estate changed hands. This is an increase of $1.7 billion, or about 14%, compared to 2017’s amount of $12.5 billion. During the fourth quarter of 2018, the value of transactions was $3.7 billion compared to $3.2 billion in the same 2017 period.

Most of the increase in both the quarter and full year total was driven by large commercial transactions. In 2018 there were 24 sales valued at $50 million or more compared to nine in 2017. These transactions account for $1.1 billion of the $1.7 billion year-over-year increase.

The Register of Deeds Office measures the value of real estate transactions by the amount of excise taxes collected on deeds. Excise taxes are based on the purchase price of a real estate, calculated as $2 per every thousand dollars of the sales price.

“The typical property owner is also seeing an increase in valuations,” said Register of Deeds Charles P. Gilliam, “the median value of a real estate sale in 2018 was $290,500, up 6%, or $16,500, compared to $274,000 during 2017. In 2014, the median value was $222,000 and is now up 31% from four years ago. This shows a compound annual growth rate of 6.8%”

For 2018 deed volume (property sales) was virtually unchanged compared to 2017. The number of deeds recorded reflects the number of real estate transfers without regard to value.

New deeds of trust, also known as mortgages on real estate, for the fourth quarter of 2018 were down 15% compared to the fourth quarter of 2017. For all of 2018, they were down 10% compared to 2017. Deed of trust volume reflects the number of lending transactions on real estate without regard to the dollar amount of the loans. Declining deed of trust volume continues a long-term trend that reflects a decrease in real estate loan refinancings.

Wake County Median Sales Price

Wake County Real Estate Sales Price

2018 Wake County Deeds

2018 Wake County Deed of Trusts

 

- 30 - 
January 15
​Discover What Happens to Your Trash after It Leaves the Curb

Free public landfill tour dates announced for 2019

Did you know that each Wake County resident generates an average of five pounds of trash every single day? Ever wonder where all that waste ends up once it’s left the curb?

Wake County’s Solid Waste Management Division invites residents to take a free tour of the South Wake Landfill in Apex to learn what happens to their trash and how to reduce the amount of waste that goes in the landfill. 

Tours of the 750-acre facility run from 9:30 a.m. until 10:30 a.m., and there are still several spots available for tomorrow, Jan. 16. And, don’t let the chilly weather hold you back – the tour takes place from the comfort of a heated bus.

During the tours, participants travel the site in a bus while learning what items should not be put in the trash, how to increase recycling and how to reduce waste at home. Participants will also learn how the Landfill Gas program is turning trash into energy.

Here’s a complete list of upcoming 2019 tour dates:

  • Wednesday, Jan. 16
  • Saturday, Feb. 9
  • Wednesday, March 6
  • Saturday, April 6
  • Wednesday, May 8
  • Saturday, June 8

The South Wake Landfill is the destination for most trash collected in the county, as well as trash collected at Wake County’s many waste drop off facilities. Approximately 450,000 tons of trash are disposed of at the landfill each year. The total amount has increased around two to three percent each year for the past five years. 

Tour participants must be eight years of age or older. Online registration is required because seats are limited. To register or learn more, visit our website.

About the Wake County Solid Waste Management Division
The Wake County Solid Waste Management Division provides waste disposal and recycling services to residents and businesses in Wake County. The division manages 19 waste facilities including a landfill, waste transfer station, residential waste and recycling convenience centers, household hazardous waste and multi-material recycling drop-off facilities. To learn more, visit wakegov.com/recycling.
January 10
​Wake County Hires Chief Community Vitality Officer

DerwickPaige.jpgAfter an extensive, nationwide search, Wake County has selected a local government leader with 34 years of proven experience to serve as its Chief Community Vitality Officer. Derwick Paige will officially start his new role with the county on Jan. 16, 2019.

“Derwick worked his way up from a planner for the City of Winston-Salem to its deputy city manager – an impressive career path that has prepared him well for this new role,” said Wake County Manager David Ellis. “We look forward to using his vast knowledge and diverse skills to help improve the lives of our residents every day.”

Paige will oversee the county’s Human Services and Environmental Services departments, as well as the newly created Department of Housing Affordability and Community Revitalization. These departments offer critical services such as public health clinics, SNAP benefits, water quality testing, restaurant inspections and affordable housing assistance.

“After retiring from the City of Winston-Salem, I couldn’t just sit at home when I knew I had more to give the community,” said Paige. “I’m excited to join the talented team at Wake County where I can put my expertise to work daily for more than 1 million residents and continue to make a difference in my community.”

Paige retired in June 2018 from his position as deputy city manager for the City of Winston-Salem, which he held for 15 years. From 1998 to 2003, he served in several high-profile community and economic development roles for the city. Prior to that, he worked for the city as the minority/women business enterprise director, a budget analyst and a city planner from 1990 to 1998. He began his career as a Winston-Salem police officer in 1984.

Paige holds a Bachelor of Science degree in administrative justice and political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as a master’s degree in Public Administration from UNC-Greensboro.

County Manager Ellis formed the chief community vitality officer position when he restructured the county’s executive leadership team. Paige will report to Ellis.
1 - 10Next

Facebook-3.pngTwitter-2.pngInstagram-2.pngYoutube-2.png

     
 
     
 
 
 
         Wake County Departments & Agencies:

                         Department-list-1.png