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June 22
​Groundbreaking Celebration Planned for Cary Regional Library

Download a rendering of the new library here.

Wake County and the Town of Cary will host a groundbreaking celebration for the Cary Regional Library and associated parking deck at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 27, at Cary’s Downtown Park, 301 S. Academy St.

The 30,000-square-foot library and 600-space parking deck will be located at the corner of Walnut Street and Kildaire Farm Road, which is adjacent to the Downtown Park. Early construction work has already begun, and both buildings are expected to be complete by the end of 2019.

Speakers at the event will include:

  • Harold Weinbrecht, mayor, Town of Cary
  • Jessica Holmes, chair, Wake County Board of Commissioners
  • Michael Wasilick, director, Wake County Public Libraries
  • Don Frantz, councilman, Cary Town Council
  • Brenda Buchanon, vice chair, Wake County Library Commission
  • Ted Boyd, manager, Cary Downtown Development

Librarians will also be on hand with children’s activities and information about library programming. The groundbreaking celebration will take place prior to the Town of Cary’s first Park After Dark of the summer, which features entertainment, food and more.

Clearscapes, P.A., is the architectural firm leading the design team, and Balfour Beatty Construction is serving as the construction manager for the project. The combined construction cost of the library and parking deck is $23.7 million. The library portion of the project is $10.7 million.

The two-story library will include a partial ground floor for library maintenance service and restrooms for visitors. The first floor of the library will house the children's collection and a large children's program room, and the second floor will feature the adult services collection, a community meeting room and a quiet study.

The project, which is a unique partnership between Wake County and the Town of Cary, will include a new town parking deck to serve patrons of the library, Cary Arts Center, Downtown Park and other nearby venues.

Parking for the groundbreaking is available at the Cary Arts Center and Cary Community Library. If it rains, the event will be held at the Cary Arts Center.

June 21
​Rabid Kitten Found near Wake Forest

Test results released June 20 show a kitten found near Wake Forest has rabies. Wake County Animal Control responded to a report of a rabid kitten on Height Lane on June 19. The kitten had attacked a person. The victim is following appropriate rabies treatment protocols.

Wake County advises residents to never handle wildlife or stray animals. Instead, they are encouraged to call Animal Control (919-856-6911) to appropriately handle the situation.

The chances of encountering animals that can transmit rabies increase as the temperatures rise. Wake County encourages pet owners to protect their pets by making sure their rabies vaccinations are up to date.

The Wake County Animal Center holds rabies clinics throughout the county, providing vaccines for only $5. Owners unsure of their pet’s vaccination status should contact their veterinarian.

Here are additional steps people can take to prevent the spread of rabies:

  • When pets are outside, they should be in a fenced-in area or on a leash. Do not leave food outside for pets, because it will also attract wildlife.
  • If you see a wild or unfamiliar animal, do not approach it, even if it seems to be behaving normally. Animals showing signs of rabies should be reported to local animal control as soon as possible.
  • Infected bats can also spread rabies. If you find a bat in a living space of your home, try to enclose it in a small room or closed-off area, and call animal control. Do not let the bat out of your house.
  • If a wild animal showing signs of rabies bites your pet and draws blood or gets in a fight with your pet, the pet is at risk for exposure to rabies. Call animal control for assistance right away. Pets that have had a rabies vaccine need to get a booster shot within 72 hours of the bite.
  • If you or someone you know has been bitten by a potentially rabid animal, wash the wound immediately with soap and water and contact your doctor.

To report animal complaints and stray animals:

  • In Wake County (except Cary, Garner, Holly Springs and Raleigh), call 919-856-6911;
  • In Cary, call 919-319-4517;
  • In Garner, call 919-772-8810;
  • In Holly Springs, call 919-557-9111; and
  • In Raleigh, call 919-831-6311.

For more information, visit wakegov.com/pets/health/rabies.

June 18
​Help Your Neighbors Stay Cool during Heat Wave

Donate fans to Cool for Wake Program

Weather forecasters predict this week will bring the hottest temperatures to date so far in 2018. Highs well over 90 degrees can be dangerous and lead to health emergencies for people who are unable to cool their homes.

You can help your neighbors stay cool and safe by donating to the Cool for Wake program. Cool for Wake delivers heat relief to those in need by providing one free fan per qualifying household from May through September, when temperatures are generally the highest.

“We typically see requests for fans increase with the temperatures, so we expect to be busy over the next few days,” said Denise Kissel, who runs the program. “To ensure we can continue meeting the health and safety needs of our community, we encourage residents to consider making an in-kind donation of a gently-used fan or air conditioner.”

The Cool for Wake program also accepts tax-deductible financial contributions.

The program, which typically distributes 350-400 fans per year, serves households without air conditioning that have residents over age 60 or children under the age of 12. A limited number of air conditioners are available to seniors and children who have a documented medical history of chronic respiratory illness.

For more information on how to qualify for Cool for Wake or to make a donation, contact Denise Kissel at 919-212-7083 or denise.kissel@wakegov.com.

June 17
​Measles Case Confirmed in Wake County

(Note: A subject matter expert will be available for media interviews on Monday, June 18, from 9:30-10:15 a.m. at the Wake County Human Services building at 10 Sunnybrook Road in Raleigh. Please call 919-857-WAKE upon arrival.)

On June 16, 2018, Wake County received confirmation of one case of measles in Wake County. The patient showed symptoms of the disease after returning from international travel.

People who have received two doses of the vaccine for measles as recommended and individuals born before 1957 are considered protected from the virus for life. For people who have not been immunized, the disease is highly contagious.

People may have been exposed to measles at the following locations, dates and times:

WakeMed Physician Practices in the WakeMed Garner Healthplex
Friday, June 8 from 11 a.m. through 3 p.m.
WakeMed Raleigh Campus: Children’s Emergency Department, Adult Emergency Department (D-Bay), Chest Pain Unit and Imaging
Friday, June 8 from 11 p.m. through Saturday, June 9 at 7 a.m.
WakeMed Raleigh Campus: Children’s Emergency Department, Adult Emergency Department (D-Bay), Chest Pain Unit and Imaging
Sunday, June 10 from 8:30 p.m. through Monday, June 11 at 3 a.m.
WakeMed Physician Practices in the WakeMed Garner Healthplex
Monday, June 11 from 1 p.m. through 5:30 p.m.
Duke University Hospital Emergency Department, Durham
Wednesday, June 13 from 3:30 p.m. through Thursday, June 14 at 1 a.m.


If you have NOT been vaccinated against measles AND were at one of these locations during the time frames listed above, call the North Carolina Communicable Disease Branch at 919-733-3419 or your doctor right away.

Do not show up at the hospital or a doctor’s office without calling first to avoid putting other patients or medical staff at risk. Your doctor can help determine if you are immune or make special arrangements to evaluate you if you are sick.

Measles is a highly contagious disease that is spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Symptoms begin with a fever, cough, runny nose and red, watery eyes. These symptoms are followed by a rash that typically appears first on the face, along the hairline or behind the ears, and then spreads to the rest of the body. The symptoms of measles usually appear about seven to 14 days after a person is infected.

People with measles are usually contagious for four days before the rash starts, the day it first appears and the following four days.Common complications include diarrhea and ear infections. Some people may suffer from severe complications, such as pneumonia (infection of the lungs) and encephalitis (swelling of the brain).Infants, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems are more at risk of complications from measles.

Vaccination is the best protection from measles. Two doses of the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine are about 97 percent effective at preventing a person from contracting the disease if exposed to it.

For more information about measles, visit the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's website.

You can also review our measles fact sheet, which is available in English and Spanish.

June 13
​Rabid Raccoon Found Near Apex

Wake County Animal Control responded to a report of a rabid raccoon on U.S. Highway 64 West between Davis Drive and Fern Valley Lane on Monday, June 11. A Wake County resident was walking his two dogs when they encountered a raccoon acting aggressively. The dogs killed the raccoon. The raccoon tested positive for rabies on Tuesday, June 12.

Both dogs are up to date on rabies vaccines and received rabies boosters on June 11. One of the dogs scratched the resident after the encounter. The resident is following appropriate rabies treatment protocols.

Wake County advises residents to never handle wildlife or stray animals. Instead, they are encouraged to call Animal Control (919-856-6911) to appropriately handle the situation.

The chances of encountering animals that can transmit rabies increase as the temperatures rise. Wake County encourages pet owners to protect their pets by making sure their rabies vaccinations are up to date.

The Wake County Animal Center holds rabies clinics throughout the county, providing vaccines for only $5. Owners unsure of their pet’s vaccination status should contact their veterinarian.

Here are additional steps people can take to prevent the spread of rabies:

  • When pets are outside, they should be in a fenced-in area or on a leash. Do not leave food outside for pets, because it will also attract wildlife.

  • If you see a wild or unfamiliar animal, do not approach it, even if it seems to be behaving normally. Animals showing signs of rabies should be reported to local animal control as soon as possible.

  • Infected bats can also spread rabies. If you find a bat in a living space of your home, try to enclose it in a small room or closed-off area, and call animal control. Do not let the bat out of your house.

  • If a wild animal showing signs of rabies bites your pet and draws blood or gets in a fight with your pet, the pet is at risk for exposure to rabies. Call animal control for assistance right away. Pets that have had a rabies vaccine need to get a booster shot within 72 hours of the bite.

  • If you or someone you know has been bitten by a potentially rabid animal, wash the wound immediately with soap and water and contact your doctor.

To report animal complaints and stray animals:

  • In Wake County (except Cary, Garner, Holly Springs and Raleigh), call 919-856-6911;
  • In Cary, call 919-319-4517;
  • In Garner, call 919-772-8810;
  • In Holly Springs, call 919-557-9111; and
  • In Raleigh, call 919-831-6311.

For more information, visit our rabies page.

June 13
​Pollinators: What’s All the Buzz About?

Did you know that pollinators are responsible for bringing us one out of every three bites of food? If bees, birds, bats and butterflies have got you befuddled, you’ll want to make a beeline to the sixth annual Pollinator Festival at Lake Crabtree County Park on Saturday, June 16.

In honor of National Pollinator Week, the festival will celebrate everything that pollinators do for us and the planet. Bring the whole family for games, crafts, food and fun. Experts will be on hand to share the buzzworthy benefits of pollinators, and vendors will sell local honey and other hive products.

Participating organizations and vendors include:

  • Buck Naked Farm
  • North Carolina State University Department of Entomology
  • Wake Audubon Society
  • We Plant It Forward
  • Wake County Solid Waste and Recycling
  • Bandido’s
  • Ice Cream Boss

The Pollinator Festival takes place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Lake Crabtree County Park, 1400 Aviation Parkway, Morrisville. Registration is not required.

To learn more about Wake County Parks, Recreation and Open Space, follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WakeGovParks. You can also check out each of our parks on Facebook.

June 11
​Stay Healthy this Summer with Free Meals for Kids

Nearly 1 in 5 children in Wake County are food insecure. This means that more than 44,600 children do not have the food they need to lead healthy lives. This need swells even more during the summer months when school is out.

To help, Wake County is partnering with local nonprofit organizations to launch the Summer Food Service Program on June 11. The program offers children and teens free, nutritious meals at participating sites throughout Wake County during the summer months. Fun activities will also be offered at each site.

“Hunger is one of the most severe roadblocks to the learning process,” said Regina Petteway, director of Wake County Human Services. “Lack of nutrition over the summer may set up a cycle for poor performance once school begins, and make children more prone to illness and other health issues. The Summer Food Service Program is designed to fill the nutrition gap and make sure children get the healthy meals they need.”

In addition to providing nutritious food, the program also educates children and families about the importance of eating well and exercising often to help build healthy habits that can last a lifetime. Activities offered at each meal site provide families with the tools they need to move more, sit less and eat smart over the summer break.

Meals are free to children and teens 18 years old and younger. There is no application necessary, and children do not have to show proof of income to receive a meal. The program will run throughout the summer, ending on Aug. 24.

Meal sites change throughout the summer, so families are encouraged to check these resources frequently to find the site most convenient to them:

  • Visit our website;
  • Call 1-866-3HUNGRY; or
  • Text “FOODNC” to 877-877.

June 05
​Give a Cat a Home During National Adopt a Shelter Cat Month

Adoption special runs Wednesdays in June

June marks the start of summer and the celebration of National Adopt a Shelter Cat Month. Typically, during warmer months, animal shelters experience an influx of cats and kittens. To help get these purr-fect cats into loving homes, the Wake County Animal Center will hold an adoption special on adult cats throughout the month.

On Wednesdays during the month of June, all cats age six months and older will be available for adoption at whatever price you choose.

Adult cats make great pets, because they have already developed their personalities and behaviors. If a cat is coming from a foster home, potential owners will know more about what the animal is like in a home environment. 

View the Wake County Animal Center Adoption Gallery to see all animals available for adoption. 

To keep the number of cats coming into the shelter down, pet owners are encouraged to have their cats spayed or neutered, even if they are indoor cats. The center also encourages residents to refrain from bringing abandoned litters of kittens to the shelter. 

“Generally, litters of kittens that are found are not abandoned. The mother is most likely out finding food for herself and will return shortly,” said Animal Center Director Dr. Jennifer Federico. “Please only bring litters of kittens to the center if you are sure that they are abandoned or in danger.”

Gift Certificates
If you know someone who wants to adopt a pet, purchase them a gift certificate for the center. Gift certificates can be purchased for any dollar amount and redeemed within a year for the adoption of a pet from the center. 


About the Wake County Animal Center
The Wake County Animal Center is an open-admission animal shelter operated by Wake County. The center receives all stray, abandoned and surrendered pets in the county and works in partnership with fosters, volunteers and local rescues to treat and rehome thousands of homeless animals every year. 

Learn more about the Wake County Animal Center and animals available for adoption here, and follow the center on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at @WakeGovPets.

June 04
​Wake County Approves $1.3 Billion Budget for FY19

Includes historic investments in education, housing affordability

The Wake County Board of Commissioners on Monday, June 4, adopted a $1.3 billion budget for Fiscal Year 2019 that includes historic investments in education and housing affordability. 

The budget provides $475.9 million in operating funds to the Wake County Public School System, a $45 million increase from Fiscal Year 2018. This record-setting total annual investment in the school district results in the highest per-pupil funding ever in Wake County.

Of that funding, $2 million is reserved to fund school counselors, social workers and psychologists per a board amendment to the recommended budget.

The adopted budget represents a $14.9 million increase in WCPSS operating funds over what County Manager David Ellis recommended in his proposed budget on May 9.

The budget also includes an additional $15 million for building and preserving housing in Wake County that working families can afford. The recurring funding for housing affordability supports a county commitment to effectively end veteran homelessness by December 2021.

To fund these historic investments in education and housing affordability, the county’s property tax will increase by 3.94 cents, bringing the rate to 65.44 cents for every $100 of property value. The tax increase would generate about $56.5 million in FY19.

With the tax increase, a property owner will pay an extra $39 in property taxes for every $100,000 of assessed value. For example, the owner of a $300,000 home will pay an additional $117 in property taxes.

The adopted budget also includes the following changes from the recommended budget:

  • The Boys & Girls Club will receive a one-time appropriation of $100,000; and

  • The Wake Smiles community dental outreach program will receive $50,000 in one-time funding.  

Other budget highlights include:  

  • Funding for Wake Technical Community College to hire faculty and staff for its new RTP campus, which is scheduled to open for regular classes in August;

  • Program funding to better coordinate access to mental health and psychiatric services for people with behavioral health needs, including school-aged children;  

  • Investments in county operations to honor financial commitments, meet growing demands for services and programs, mitigate risks and address emerging needs. Efforts include opening new libraries, adding ambulances to Wake County EMS, enhancing the county’s cybersecurity and supporting a comprehensive water supply study; and

  • Support for 12 nonprofit organizations that positively affect the community in areas such as early childhood education, food security, and arts and culture.

The 2019 Fiscal Year runs from July 1, 2018, to June 30, 2019. More information and budget materials are available at wakegov.com/budget.

May 31
Wake County Register of Deeds Contacts Legislators Urging Action and Passage of HB 977

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Thursday, May 31, 2018
For Immediate Release

Contact: Luther Snyder, Deputy Director
O. 919-856-5462 M. 919-369-7045
luther.snyder@wakegov.com

WAKE COUNTY REGISTER OF DEEDS CONTACTS LEGISLATORS URGING ACTON AND PASSAGE OF HB 977

House Bill 977 aims to limit pensions for convicted government officials

Raleigh, NC – Wake County Register of Deeds Charles Gilliam wrote letters to the entire seventeen-member Wake County delegation in the NC General Assembly urging support and passage for HB 977 - a bill that limits pensions for elected government officials who are convicted of illegal activity - such as fraud and embezzlement. (see accompanying letter to legislators). The bill was prompted by recommendations from Dale Folwell, the state treasurer.

“When the people are being stolen from, they should not have to pay for the privilege. I urge the NC General Assembly to act and pass this bill as soon as possible. The longer we wait, the more instances for which criminals will escape a remedy.” states Charles Gilliam, Wake County Register of Deeds.

The legislation when passed will bolster the tools law enforcement has available to deal with elected officials that commit these crimes.

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