Most people with Hepatitis C do not know they are infected.

Hepatitis C may not cause symptoms for years or even decades, while slowly damaging the liver. By the time symptoms appear, liver damage is often significant. Left untreated, Hepatitis C can cause liver damage, cancer and even death. It is also the number-one cause of liver transplants.

Hepatitis C can be treated. Make sure you get tested!

Wake County offers FREE Hepatitis C testing at several convenient locations: 

Hepatitis C Overview

Hepatitis C is a liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus.

Over time, chronic Hepatitis C can cause serious health problems. In fact, Hepatitis C is a leading cause of liver cancer and the leading cause of liver transplants.

Treatments are now available that can cure Hepatitis C.

Risk Factors

Some people are at increased risk for Hepatitis C, including:
  • People born from 1945 to 1965, sometimes referred to as baby boomers. These people are five times more likely to have Hepatitis C than other adults.
  • Current and past injection drug users, including those who injected only one time or many years ago.
  • Recipients of donated blood, blood products or organs before 1992.
  • People who received body piercing or tattoos done with non-sterile instruments.

Why should people born from 1945 to 1965 get tested?

People born from 1945 to 1965, sometimes referred to as baby boomers, are five times more likely to have Hepatitis C than other adults.

While anyone can get Hepatitis C, 3 in 4 people with Hepatitis C were born from 1945–1965.
Since many people can live with Hepatitis C for decades without symptoms or feeling sick, testing is critical so those who are infected can get treated and cured. 

Symptoms

Many people with chronic Hepatitis C do not have symptoms and do not know they are infected.

People with chronic Hepatitis C can live for decades without symptoms or feeling sick. When symptoms do appear, they often are a sign of advanced liver disease.

Symptoms of Hepatitis C can include: fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, grey-colored stools, joint pain and/or jaundice.

Additional Information

To learn more, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.