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Bus ridership is the number of passenger boardings among the primary public transportation service providers in Wake County: Capital Area Transit (CAT), Cary Transit (C-Tran), North Carolina State University Transportation (NCSU Wolfline), and Triangle Transit Authority (TTA). Bus ridership measures the use of public transportation among citizens who use the service for financial reasons or personal preferences in Wake County, and indicates the adequacy of public transportation options in the community. Heavy use of public transportation has the ability to reduce highway wear, congestion, transportation costs and exhaust emissions. Many factors impact bus ridership, including affordability, convenience of schedules, service reliability, route proximity to origins and destinations, vehicle conditions, and how efficiently the system links citizens to school, work, goods and services.
Passenger boardings increased for all Wake County bus service providers in the last year. C-Tran grew at the fastest rate, having 40% more boardings in 2012 than in 2011.
Data is updated annually on or around September 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections, subject to data being available from the National Transit Database, American Public Transportation Association and each service provider.
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​In FY 2012, bus ridership increased 13.5% among service providers in Wake County. The region has shown a sustained increase in bus ridership, with an annual average growth of 8.9% since FY 2006. According to the American Public Transportation Association’s Ridership Report Archives, nationwide bus ridership increased 2.2% in FY 2012, and public transit ridership of any form increased 2.9% during the same period.
Not applicable.
TransportationDecember 2012
10,990,715 passenger boardings
Because Triangle Transit Authority also provides service to Durham and Orange counties, data provided by this indicator includes passenger boardings in Orange and Durham counties as well as in Wake.

  
Vehicle miles traveled is the annual number of miles traveled by personal and commercial vehicles on Wake County roads and highways. Both citizens and governments can benefit when fewer vehicle miles are traveled, as fewer miles traveled results in less wear on local roads, decreased roadway congestion and reduced carbon emissions. Reducing miles traveled also contributes to a higher quality of life, as it means citizens are spending less time in cars and less money on roadway maintenance, fuel and vehicle maintenance.

Vehicle miles traveled is in part a factor of the organization and infrastructure of the region (are employment, shopping, and service centers conveniently located to residential areas?) and public transportation systems (can a citizen elect to use public transportation options regularly?). However, it is important to remember that declining vehicle miles may also be a sign of a weakening economy, as vehicle miles traveled is also a signal that goods and services are moving around the county, that citizens are commuting to work, and that citizens are able to afford owning and operating an automobile.
Although total vehicle miles has increased annually for decades, vehicle miles traveled per capita is declining.
Data is made available monthly by request from the North Carolina Department of Transportation. Data is published here biannually on or around February 15 and August 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

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While total annual vehicle miles has increased steadily since 1990, the number of vehicle miles traveled per capita has shown an overall decrease, dropping from an average of 31 miles traveled per day per capita in 1990, to 27 miles per day per capita in 2013.
Not applicable
TransportationDecember 2013
28 miles traveled daily per capita
From 1990 to 2008, the North Carolina Department of Transportation used one process to calculate vehicle miles traveled (VMT) at the state level and a different process to calculate VMT at the county level. When summed, VMT numbers reported by counties did not match those reported by the state. In 2009, due to modifications to the Highway Performance Monitoring System required by the Federal Highway Administration, the North Carolina Department of Transportation changed its method for calculating VMT at both the county and the statewide levels. This resulted in improved consistency between state and county VMT reports but also resulted in a large jump in county-level VMT from 2008 to 2009. Because a consistent methodology was used from 1990 to 2008 to calculate county VMT, the actual VMT growth trends at the county level are valid. Therefore, to account for the jump in annual county VMT numbers that occurred in 2009, county VMT numbers for years prior to 2009 were revised following the updated 2009 methodology. Both reported and revised VMT numbers are displayed on WCBTN. County level VMT data is not available prior to 1990. Please contact the North Carolina Department of Transportation with further questions.

  
This indicator provides insight into how Wake County citizens choose to get around, and how land development patterns affect road network use. The average time of commute is the amount of time a person typically spends traveling one way between home and work, regardless of transportation mode. The negative impacts of long commute times are far reaching, affecting the financial self-sufficiency and productivity of individuals, the economic output and desirability of the community, and the environment and the industries that depend upon its health, such as tourism and recreation. A community that provides a rich, multimodal infrastructure (such as public transportation, greenways and bike lanes) takes steps to reduce the number of automobiles weighing on the roadways, decrease congestion and increase transportation options for citizens. Of course, commute time is not dependent on infrastructure alone; it is also reliant upon an adequate balance between residential and commercial districts, as well as the habits and choices of citizens.
Of Wake County's 475,400 workers, 388,987 (82%) worked within the county in 2012.
Data is made available annually by the US Census Bureau in October. Data is published here annually on or around October 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.
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From 2006 to 2012, the Wake County average commuting time declined by nearly a minute and a half, from 24.8 to 23.4 minutes, while North Carolina saw no change. As the average commute time in Wake County has fallen, the national average has shown steady increase. In Wake County, more than 4 out of 5 workers commute alone in a personal automobile, which is similar to national and state averages.
Not applicable.
TransportationJuly 2012
23.4 minutes
Not applicable.

  
Funding for public transportation is the actual amount spent on public transportation service providers in Wake County. Expenditures include both operating and capital dollars by local, state and federal governments. Service providers in Wake County are Capital Area Transit (CAT), Cary Transit (C-Tran), North Carolina State University Transportation (NCSU Wolfline), and Triangle Transit Authority (TTA). Public transit users subsidize bus operations in the form of bus fares; but transit providers depend upon a mix of local funds and federal and state aid to provide transit services. To maintain and improve operations, public transportation agencies must maintain a sustainable and equitable balance between these funding sources. Changes to local funding for public transportation may be due to a combination of factors, such as the cost of public transportation services, changes in fare or fare revenue, changes to federal and/or state assistance, and expansion of bus services.
In 2012, fare revenues accounted for about 14% of public transit operating costs.
Data is updated annually on or around September 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections, subject to data being available from the National Transit Database, American Public Transportation Association and each service provider.
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Local funding for public transportation has increased in recent years due to new and expanded bus routes and increasing cost of service. Historically, local public transportation service providers have funded approximately 16% of capital projects (route expansion, fleet expansion, etc.) while the remaining 84% are funded through federal and state grants/assistance. For operating costs, local agencies tend to fund a higher share, nearly 70%, with the balance provided through performance-based federal programs and state grants.
Not applicable.
TransportationDecember 2012
$64,728,317
Triangle Transit also provides service to Durham and Orange counties, so numbers reported below also include funds provided by those governments. NCSU Wolfline is funded largely by student fees, which are categorized here as a local funding source.

  
Population change is a main signifier of a region’s desirability and viability. People move into areas that offer attractive services, jobs, education and overall quality of life, and they stay in areas where their needs continue to be met as they age. Changes in population  suggest swings in economic and development patterns; some examples of changes that may attract a population are business openings, transit station openings, housing program implementation, farmland conversion, and improvements within the local public school system. If unplanned for, rising populations can drain local resources; however, a popular community is generally a sustainable one, as a growing population brings with it a growing tax base and a competitive work force.
Based on July 1, 2013, U.S. Census population estimates, County staff predicts Wake will surpass 1 million residents by September 2014.

The N.C. State Demographer publishes population projections for state, county and municipal jurisdictions.

2010 Census Wake County General Demographics Profile

2010 Census Wake County Municipal Populations

The United States Census Bureau publishes official national, state and county population estimates and population estimate revisions for prior years annually in March. Municipal estimates are published annually in May. Data is published here on or around June 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

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Municipal and County Population Estimates 

 
Jurisdiction
(part within
Wake County only)
Decennial 
Census Count
July 1 
Annual Population Estimates
2010-2013 
Population Change
2010 ​2011 2012​ 2013​ ​Number Percent​
Wake County 900,993 929,070 952,143 974,289 73,296 8.1%
Angier (pt.) 103 105 106 108 5 4.9%
Apex 37,476 38,787 40,460 42,214 4,738 12.6%
Cary (pt.) 133,812 140,301 144,285 149,513 15,701 11.7%
Fuquay-Varina 17,937 19,141 19,970 21,277 3,340 18.6%
Garner 25,745 26,348 26,749 26,772 1,027 4.0%
Holly Springs  24,661 25,775 26,871 28,915 4,254 17.2%
Knightdale  11,401 12,055 12,736 13,291 1,890 16.6%
Morrisville (pt.) 18,576 19,548 20,603 21,932 3,356 18.1%
Raleigh (pt.) 402,825 413,019 422,246 430,630 27,805 6.9%
Rolesville 3,786 4,039 4,253 4,649 863 22.8%
Wake Forest  (pt.) 29,218 30,771 32,067 33,758 4,540 15.5%
Wendell 5,845   6,159 6,135 290 5.0%
Zebulon  (pt.) 4,433 4,533 4,604 4,591 158 3.6%
File: 7/1/2013 Subcounty Population Estimates
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division
Release Date: May 2014
Note: All geographic boundaries for these population estimates are as of January 1, 2013. 
 

   

Wake County is the 2nd most populous county in North Carolina, and in 2013 was the 4th fastest growing county in the United States in terms of the number of residents added among counties with populations over 10,000. In 2000 Wake County was the 85th most populous county in the United States. By 2010 it was the 50th, and in 2013 Wake ranked 46th.
Not applicable
PeopleJuly 1, 2013
974,289 residents
The Census Bureau revises its July 1 series of population estimates annually, including updating previously published estimates for prior years. Population estimates are also available from the State Demographer, and may differ from those published by the Census Bureau.

  
Population density, or population per square mile of land area, is a by-product of population growth and indicates where and how much growth occurs within the county. Monitoring changes in population densities provides an opportunity to assess land use in urban, suburban and rural areas. Urban areas have population densities measuring at least 3,000 people per square mile and are expected to have a concentrated mix of housing, retail, education, medical, recreation and transportation options. Communities measuring below 1,000 people per square mile are rural areas, where residences and amenities are spread farther apart from each other, as the land is used primarily for agriculture, forestry, horticulture, or open space and parks. Population density impacts costs of service provision, as government and business investments are made based on the efficiency and expense of marketing, distributing or serving populations over the expanse of a geographic service area.
Between 2000 and 2012, Morrisville's population density increased by 224%, the highest increase among all core municipalities in Wake County.

​Not applicable

The United States Census Bureau publishes official national, state and county population estimates and population estimate revisions for prior years annually in March. Municipal estimates are published annually in May. Data is published here on or around March 30 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

 

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Wake County is an urbanizing county. The population density grew by 51% between 2000 and 2012, from 755 to 1,140 persons per square mile. In 2012 four Wake County municipalities ranked in the top 15 of the most densely populated cities in North Carolina: Raleigh (#4), Cary (#7), Apex (#9) and Morrisville (#13).
Not applicable
PeopleJuly 1, 2013
1,167 people/square mile
Note that a decline in population density may not be solely attributable to a decline in population, as this statistic is also affected by annexations. Population density is calculated here using land area only. If a municipality annexes a significant number of acres that is underdeveloped or not heavily populated, its overall population density may decline.

  
Migration, along with births and deaths, are the components that determine an area's population change. Total net migration itself is a factor of two determinants: internal migration and international migration. Internal migration is the number of people moving from one area in the county, state or nation to another, while international migration tracks the movement of the foreign-born and the emigration of the native-born. Because people move to areas that offer the jobs they need and the quality of life they desire, net migration is a useful tool in assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a region, both economically and socially. Understanding the origins and destinations of a community's residents helps businesses and local governments predict the community’s changing needs and plan for changes in service demands.
781 new residents moved from Miami-Dade County, Fla., between 2007 and 2011, constituting the highest in-migration from any single county outside of North Carolina. 560 former Wake County residents moved to Maricopa County, Ariz., in that same time period, representing the highest out-flow to any county outside of North Carolina.
The United States Census Bureau publishes prior year's population component change data annually in March. Data is published here annually on or around March 30 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

 

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Wake County leads the state in net migration. On average, migration has accounted for about 67% of population change annually since 1990.
Not applicable
PeopleJuly 2013
62 net new residents per day

Through 2010, net migration numbers are derived from US Census Bureau population numbers and vital statistics from the North Carolina State Demographer. Net migration was found by employing the following formula:

Residual net migration = (population in the latter year – population in earlier year) – (births – deaths).

Beginning in 2011, the US Census Bureau began publishing components of population change estimates, which includes net migration numbers. Subsequently, Wake County by the Numbers began relying solely on Census estimates beginning in 2011.

According the the US Census Bureau, total population change includes a residual. This residual represents the change in population that cannot be attributed to any specific demographic component.

  
Median age measures the relative age of a population by dividing the area's population age distribution into two equal parts: the halves of the population younger and older than the median value. For instance, a median age of 55 means that half of the represented population is over 55, reflecting the prevalence of more middle age and senior adults in an area. Shifts in a population’s age can be attributed to the net impact of changes in life expectancy, declining or increasing birth rates, and migration to and from an area. Many services, from schools to libraries to health and human services, are impacted by the age of the population they serve. Trends in a population’s aging can help business owners and service providers plan for meeting the evolving needs of the community.
Wake County’s population is predicted to reach a median age of 40 by 2030.
County, state and national data is made available annually in October by the US Census Bureau. Municipal data is made available in December. Data is published here annually on or around December 30 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.
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Since 1990 Wake County’s median age has increased significantly, from 31.5 in 1990 to 35.3 in 2013; however, the median age remains consistently lower than the national (37.6) and state (38.1) median age.
Not applicable
PeopleDecember 2012
35.3 years of age
Depending on the size of the jurisdiction, the Census Bureau's one-year or five-year estimates were referenced to determine each jurisdiction's median age. One-year estimates, used for higher-populated areas and, therefore, used for county, state and national data, are considered more current, while five-year estimates are considered more accurate and are used for municipal data. More can be read about these estimates here: http://www.census.gov/acs/www/guidance_for_data_users/estimates/

  
The region of origin of Wake County residents is a main signifier of the county’s diversity, an important goal in Wake County as diversity enhances our communities socially and economically. The number of the foreign-born population in a community hinges on many factors: proximity to employment, education and transportation opportunities, infrastructure, the efforts exerted by the community to attract foreign-born residents, and the nature of public and private service provisions. Growing diversity in the racial and ethnic makeup of a community brings with it both opportunities and challenges. Foreign-born residents contribute to a culturally vibrant community and can bring experiences that enhance the local economy. Changes in the percentage of foreign-born residents within a population may also signal a need for modifications to service delivery from many segments of the community, including medical providers, school systems, businesses and elected officials.
The largest groups of foreign-born populations in Wake County come from Latin America (42% of foreign-born) and Asia (36%).
County, state and national data is made available annually in October by the US Census Bureau. County data is made available in December. Data is published here annually on or around December 30 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

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The largest concentrations of foreign-born residents in Wake County reside in Morrisville, Cary and Raleigh. Wake County's foreign-born population, which on average makes up about 13% of the overall population, mirrors the concentration of foreign-born population nationally (13%). North Carolina's foreign-born population is lower, at about 8% of the overall population.
Not applicable
PeopleDecember 2012
13% of the total population
Depending on the size of the municipality, the Census Bureau's one-year or five-year estimates were referenced to determine the foreign-born population residing in each jurisdiction. One-year estimates, used for higher-populated areas, are considered more current and so are used for county, state and national data, while five-year estimates are considered more accurate and are used for municipal data. More can be read about these estimates here: http://www.census.gov/acs/www/guidance_for_data_users/estimates/

  
A household includes all the persons who occupy a housing unit as their usual place of residence. A housing unit is a house, apartment, mobile home, group of rooms, or single room that is occupied or intended for occupancy as separate living quarters, regardless of the nature of the relationship of the occupants sharing the living arrangements. The count of total households provides information about population growth, land development patterns, the health of the housing market, and land density patterns in Wake County.
Between 2000 and 2010, the number of households in Wake County increased by 43%.
County data is made available annually in October by the US Census Bureau. Municipal data is made available in December. Data is published here annually on or around December 30 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

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The total number of households in Wake County has increased slightly between 2006 and 2012. Rolesville, Morrisville and Holly Springs saw the highest household growth rate from 2000 to 2010.
Not applicable
PeopleJuly 2012
357,684 households
Depending on the size of the municipality, the Census Bureau's one-year or five-year estimates were referenced to determine each municipality's median age. One-year estimates, used for higher-populated areas and, therefore, used for county data, are considered more current, while five-year estimates are considered more accurate, and are used for municipal data. More can be read about these estimates here: http://www.census.gov/acs/www/guidance_for_data_users/estimates/

  
Household size measures the average number of people residing in a single housing unit, reflecting residents' living arrangements. While family size is certainly a main determiner of household size, this number also provides insight into the financial self-sufficiency of Wake County’s residents. A county can see an uptick in household size as residents seek roommates or move back in with family during financially hard times. Household size may decrease as residents choose to live independently or with fewer roommates as finances stabilize. Housing size is also affected by the health and sufficiency of the housing market. The lack of enough affordable housing units could generate a rise in household size among some population groups. This statistic also impacts population density, which in turn affects how planners shape land usage. School systems, residential and commercial developers, and transportation planners rely on this information when designing their services, programs and products.
The average household size of owner-occupied households (2.71) is slightly higher than the size of renter-occupied households (2.41).

​Not applicable

Data is made available annually in October by the US Census Bureau. Data is published here annually on or around October 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

 

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Wake County's average household size, which hovers around 2.6 people per household, mirrors that of the nation. The State of North Carolina's households average closer to 2.5 people.
Not applicable
PeopleDecember 2012
2.6 people per household
Not applicable

  
The number of single-family and multi-family units permitted annually provides insight into construction activity, development patterns and population growth within the county. The concentration of single-family, mid-rise and high-rise development can impact how surrounding transportation and commercial development systems function. As increases in residential units reflect population growth or movement, this indicator may be used to estimate changes to the tax base and public school student enrollment on a year-to-year basis.

This indicator bridges the number of building permits issued in the county and the number of households in the county. For example, a duplex requires a single building permit, but is considered two permitted housing units.

Housing unit counts are released by the US Census Bureau, while residential building permit counts are released by the Wake County Revenue Department. Differences in how and when these numbers are calculated may account for the discrepancy between single-family units permitted and residential building permits issued.
In 2012, 6,501 multi-family units were permitted in Wake County. This is the only time in the last 13 years that the number of multi-family units exceeded single-family dwellings permitted.
Data is made available monthly by the US Census Bureau. Data is published here biannually on or around February 15 and August 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.
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The effects of the national economic downturn were apparent in Wake County’s construction sector. Between 2007 and 2009, the number of permitted housing units fell by 71%. The number of single-family units permitted has increased annually since 2009.
DevelopmentJune 2014
6,629 single-family and 3,397 multi-family units permitted in 2013
Housing unit counts are released by the US Census Bureau, while residential building permit counts are released by the Wake County Revenue Department. Differences in how and when these numbers are calculated may account for the discrepancy between single-family units permitted and residential building permits issued.

  
Annexation, the incorporation of new territory into an existing municipality, provides insight into population growth and development activity, both key measures of local economic health. Annexation demonstrates the ability of local governments to expand services, it illustrates where developers are seeking to build, and it indicates where people are deciding to live. Annexations may occur through three methods: 1) city-initiated (“involuntary”), 2) by petition from property-owners or residents (“voluntary”), and 3) by act of the General Assembly (“legislative”).
45% of land in Wake County's 857 square miles falls within the County's planning jurisdiction.
Data is published here annually on or around July 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

 

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Numbers of acres annexed by municipalities plummeted from 7,002 acres in 2007 to 669 acres in 2011. In 2013, the most acres were annexed by Cary (417 acres), Knightdale (354), Apex (283), Wake Forest (269) and Raleigh (234). Wake County municipalities primarily employ "voluntary" annexations.
Not applicable.
DevelopmentDecember 2013
1,899 acres annexed in 2013
Not applicable.

  
This indicator provides the count and cumulative value of permits issued annually that change the tax value of residential real property. Such changes include new construction, additions, renovations and demolitions. Issued permits that do not modify the taxable value of real property, such as permits issued for mechanical, electrical, plumbing and other minor alterations, are not reported here. Construction is a key measure of economic activity, providing insight into the health of the local economy, development patterns and building industry status. As increases in residential permits reflect population growth or movement, this indicator may be used to estimate changes to the tax base on a year-to-year basis.

Residential building permit counts are released by the Wake County Revenue Department, while housing unit counts are released by the US Census Bureau. Differences in how and when these numbers are calculated may account for the discrepancy between single-family units permitted and residential building permits issued.
2013 was the strongest year in the number of residential permits issued since the recession.
Data is made available monthly by the Wake County Revenue Department. Data is published here biannually on or around February 15 and August 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

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The effects of the national economic downturn were apparent in Wake County’s construction sector. In 2008, the number of permits issued for new residential construction fell 50%, and the dollar value of those permits fell 53%. Recovery in both number and value of residential permits has been gradual.
DevelopmentJune 2014
3,025 permits issued for new residential buildings from January through June 2014
The number and cumulative value of residential permits takes into consideration only those permits that change the tax value of the properties they affect. Apartment buildings are considered commercial, not residential, for permitting purposes. Residential building permit counts are released by the Wake County Revenue Department, while housing unit counts are released by the US Census Bureau. Differences in how and when these numbers are calculated may account for the discrepancy between single-family units permitted and residential building permits issued.

  
The number of registered vehicles includes all vehicle registrations issued by the State of North Carolina within Wake County. In addition to providing an estimate for the number of vehicles that travel local roads and highways, vehicle registrations also provide indirect insight into the buying decisions of citizenry. Personal buying choices are influenced by many factors. Economic conditions and individual economic self-sufficiency enable citizens to purchase and afford a car. The necessity of owning a car may be affected by land use and the convenience of multimodal transportation options. Furthermore, changes to the rate of vehicle registrations may indicate vehicle market saturation.
In 2013, 0.8 vehicles were registered per capita.

​Not applicable.

Annual data is available upon request from the Wake County Revenue Department. Data is published here annually on or around October 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.
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Between 1995 and 2008, vehicle registrations increased, on average, by 23,167 per year. Between 2009 and 2013, the average new registrations per year decreased to 6,326. This slowing of vehicle registration growth rate has occurred despite a consistent increase in population, dropping the number of vehicle registrations per capita from 0.86 vehicles per person in 2008 to 0.80 vehicles per person in 2013.
Not applicable.
TransportationDecember 2013
769,366 vehicles registered
Not applicable

  
Unemployment rate measures the percentage of the available labor force without work, excluding military, students, homemakers and those not otherwise seeking work. Employment numbers are a primary signal of an area’s desirability and sustainability. If an area is able to maintain and increase the supply of jobs, the area is likely to attract and retain businesses and residents. Employment numbers reflect the status of the area's economy and reflect the vitality of the area's business climate.
Since 2008, Wake County's annual unemployment rate peaked in 2010 at 8.6%.
Data is made available monthly by the North Carolina Labor Market Information Division. Data is published here biannually on or around February 15 and August 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.
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Wake County’s unemployment rate, even during the most recent recession, consistently remains lower than the unemployment rate of North Carolina and of the United States. Wake County’s unemployment rate has been declining since 2010.
July 29, 2014 – Revised charts using updated information that goes through May 2014.
EconomicsMay 2014
5.3% unemployment rate
The unemployment number does not include military, students, homemakers and those not otherwise seeking work. Unemployment rate is based on residents' place of residence, not place of work. The rates reported here are seasonally unadjusted, meaning that the numbers are not statistically adjusted to eliminate seasonal fluctuations such as weather, holidays, and the opening and closing of schools.

  
Educational attainment refers to the highest level of education that an adult has completed. Generally, education level is reported as 1) less than high school (earning no degree); 2) high school graduate with some college; and 3) college graduate with a bachelor's degree or higher. Beyond indicating the adequacy of the community's education system, geographic areas with higher rates of college graduates typically also have higher household and family incomes, lower unemployment rates and healthier communities. These conditions reflect the decisions of higher-paying employers to locate in an area with an educated, prepared workforce, which in turn creates a viable, competitive local and regional economy.
In 2012, the percentage of Wake County adult residents with a bachelor's degree or higher ranked 8th nationally among counties with at least 500,000 adults age 25 or older.
Data is made available annually in October by the US Census Bureau. Data is published here annually on or around October 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

 

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The percentage of Wake County's population age 25 and over who have attained high school and bachelor's degrees is consistently higher than state and national averages. In 2012, the percentage of Wake County's adult population with a bachelor's degree was more than 60% higher than the state (27.4%) or the national (29.1%) average.
Not applicable
EconomicsDecember 2012
47.5% of the County's adult population has a bachelor's degree or higher
Not applicable

  
Median household income divides income distribution into two equal parts: half of the area's households fall above the median household income, and half fall below. This statistic includes the incomes of the head of the household and all individuals 15 years and older in a household over the last 12 months. Median household income reflects the relative wealth of a community, the financial resources of its residents, and the ability of individuals and families to afford basic needs, such as housing, utilities, food, transportation and healthcare costs. Business owners often rely on median household income to gauge whether a viable market exists for their consumer products and services.
In 2012 Wake County had the highest median household income in the state.

​Not applicable

County, state and national data is made available annually by the US Census Bureau in October. Municipal data is made available in December. Data is published here annually on or around December 30 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

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While the median household income in Wake County has declined since the 2008 economic downturn, it is consistently significantly higher than the state and national statistics.
Not applicable
EconomicsDecember 2012
$63,791
Depending on the size of the municipality, the Census Bureau's one-year or five-year estimates were referenced to determine each municipality's median age. One-year estimates, used for higher-populated areas and, therefore, used for county, state and national data, are considered more current, while five-year estimates are considered more accurate, and are used for municipal data. More can be read about these estimates here: http://www.census.gov/acs/www/guidance_for_data_users/estimates/

  
The poverty rate measures the percentage of individuals whose income does not meet the federal poverty threshold, which varies depending on the size of the family. The percent of the population below the federal poverty level reflects the ability of citizens to meet basic needs, like food, housing, education, transportation and medical expenses. Along with rates of higher education, poverty rate is a main measure of the social, economic and physical health of a community.
In 2012 Wake County had the lowest poverty rate among urban counties in North Carolina.
County, state and national data is made available annually by the US Census Bureau in October. Municipal data is made available in December. Data is published here annually on or around December 30 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

 

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Mirroring national and state trends, the number and percentage of people with incomes below the federal poverty line has increased since 2008. Between 2008 and 2012, the number of Wake County residents living at or below poverty level increased by more than 30,000, from 77,150 to an estimate of 107,942; however, the Wake County poverty rate has been consistently significantly lower than the state and national poverty rates.
Not applicable.
EconomicsDecember 2012
11.6% of the population lives below the federal poverty threshold
Depending on the size of the municipality, the Census Bureau's one-year or five-year estimates were referenced to determine each municipality's median age. One-year estimates, used for higher-populated areas and, therefore, used for county, state and national data, are considered more current, while five-year estimates are considered more accurate and are used for municipal data. More can be read about these estimates here: http://www.census.gov/acs/www/guidance_for_data_users/estimates/
  
The number and value of commercial building permits includes the count of and cumulative dollar value of all permits issued annually that change the tax value of commercial real property. Such changes include new building, additions, renovations and demolitions. Issued permits that do not modify the taxable value of real property, such as permits for mechanical, electrical, plumbing and other minor alterations, are not reported in this indicator. Construction is a key measure of economic activity, providing insight into the health of the local economy, development patterns and building industry status. Because the permits included here are only those that change tax value, this indicator may be used to estimate changes to the property tax base on a year-to-year basis.
Since 2008 the number of permits issued for demolishing buildings exceeded the number issued for constructing new commercial buildings in 2009, 2010 and 2011.
Data is made available monthly by the Wake County Revenue Department. Data is published here biannually on or around February 15 and August 15 by Wake County Planning, Development and Inspections.

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The effects of the national economic downturn were apparent in Wake County’s construction sector. In 2009, the number of permits issued for new construction fell by 61% from 2008, and the dollar value of those permits fell by 75%. By 2012, the value of commercial permits had surpassed 2005 levels.
DevelopmentJune 2014
175 permits issued for new commercial buildings from January through June 2014
The number and cumulative value of commercial permits takes into consideration only those permits that change the tax value of the property they affect. Wake County Revenue Department's commercial building permit data includes permits issued for apartments, industrial, commercial, office and other non-residential building.

 

 
 
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